Tag Archives: Duffy Crane and Hauling

Article from Colorado Politics
Jeff Cummings
March 19, 2019
https://bit.ly/2Jo3nAY

Jeff Cummings
In the world of business one of the greatest enemies is uncertainty. Insecurity makes it difficult for businesses to formulate plans for the future and make investments or add jobs.

Making an investment of millions of dollars whether that is replacing equipment or expanding operations is a difficult decision for any business. It involves a number of considerations. A major factor though in any decision of this nature is the perceived future conditions not only as to the overall national economy but the current and future business environment within the state and communities where such an investment would be made. To a large extent this view is shaped by the laws and regulations of state and local governments today as well as where they may be headed in the future. It’s not only the companies, themselves, that must feel comfortable about the future but also the financiers responsible for providing the loans and capital for the business.

Colorado’s economic success over the years has been in many ways shaped by a somewhat stable environment for business. While control of the legislature and Governor’s Office may have changed with shifts to the left or to the right, those changes were for the most part muted by people in both parties who recognized the importance of preserving a stable environment for business and jobs to prosper in the state.

This situation has led to Colorado’s economy being ranked by US News and World Report as the #1 economy in the country last year after having several years of 3 percent or greater GDP growth. Such an achievement is a testimony to legislators and administrations over the past 20 years who have steered the ship of state in a direction in a manner which made businesses comfortable to make long term investments here and create one of the best economic success stories in the country.

Recent actions by the General Assembly and governor have given a jolt to the business community and uncertainty about the business environment is growing. Each week it appears that a new measure with some fiscal or regulatory impact emerges from the General Assembly. This has led many business people within the state as well as those from the outside, who may be considering Colorado for a future site, to take pause. Those businesses, like mine, must assess how the changes already enacted or being considered, may affect them and their operations and whether they can obtain a future return on investment. Many are asking whether they should invest in new equipment, add jobs, or consider business expansion in this uncertain and continually changing environment. Can they obtain a return on those investments or be able to support adding new employees? The fear is that in light of this uncertainty and a rapidly changing environment with no idea of the end game, many businesses begin to apply the brakes or even contract their business operations. When this occurs, the economic miracle that Colorado has experienced, may go in reverse, and in a hurry. Instead of a growing economy with budget surpluses and low unemployment, we may witness the Colorado economy retrench. Rather than being a state fielding offers for businesses to relocate here from other states, we may find ourselves engaged in retaining our existing ones from being drawn to more business friendly environments.

As we have seen in some other states, where measures were viewed to have gone too far, it’s difficult to “unring the bell” when businesses begin to view a state as being unfriendly.

The governor and the legislature are at a critical juncture. There is a need to slow down the legislative blizzard and engage the business community more on the possible impacts or implications. Taking a little more time and speaking with business people, affected by many of these changes, may help in better shaping the measures so as to avoid inadvertent or unforeseen problems that may severely damage our state and its economy today and into the future.

Jeff Cummings is the president and CEO of Duffy Crane and Hauling, one of Colorado’s oldest companies. He is a past chairman and current board director of the Colorado Motor Carriers Association, which represents over 650 companies involved in trucking in Colorado.

Summit Daily
Eli Pace
September 27, 2017

The largest crane ever used for a construction project in Summit County hoisted out the old 100-foot Nike Bridge at the Silverthorne Outlets on Wednesday to replace it with a new "Bridge to Savings."

Altogether, the town spent about $500,000 on the bridge-replacement project after determining it would be cheaper in the long run to swap out the old deteriorating bridge rather than keep up regular painting and maintenance on it, said Mark Leidal, assistant town manager.

The new bridge is made of corten steel, an alloy that forms a rust-like appearance after being exposed to the elements for several years and eliminates any need for paint.

Also, the new bridge can easily handle a 10,000-pound load, said Tom Daugherty, Silverthorne's director of public works, adding that it's strong enough "you could drive a pickup across it."

Moving the 25-year-old, 100-foot span, however, was easier said than done. The problem wasn't so much the weight of the bridges — 45,000 pounds for the old one and 52,000 pounds on the new one — a relatively light lift by modern-day standards.

Instead, it was how far the crane had to extend to safely pick the bridge up, swing it over a cluster of lodge pole pine trees and clear a handful of shops in the Outlets.

The nine-axle crane is rated to lift 450 tons, according to Frank Just of Duffy Crane and Hauling, the company that was contracted to do the work.

"Big crane," he said matter-of-factly.

All decked out with the necessary weights to counter-balance the lift, the crane weighed almost 500,000 pounds by itself.

"This machine cost $3.2 million," Just said. "It's one of the largest cranes in this area. There are a few bigger, but this is the biggest crane that's ever been in Summit County."

As the old bridge was coming up, Daugherty said the new bridge comes with at least a 50-year lifespan, and he and Leidal both took satisfaction in the fact that the bridge should outlive them.

Daugherty said the new bridge is expected to open to the public sometime at the end of next week, once the decking and concrete work is complete. After that, they'll add lighting and decorative flags.

Spanning more than 100 feet over the Blue River, the town is calling the new path a "Bridge to Savings," and it comes as a small piece of the town's downtown-redevelopment strategy. In a news release, town officials said the new bridge will provide "a beautiful new entryway" for shoppers looking to save money on their favorite brands at the Outlets.

All stores will remain open during construction, which is expected to continue through Oct. 15, and the center plans to host a "Bridge to Savings" sale in the near future to commemorate the event.


Click here to view the video, and read the article from Summit Daily

This is a 2 crane pick for a 170,000 lb. transformer. Duffy was hired to load and transport the transformer from the location where it was serviced to its final destination.

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Two crane pick, Transformer

Two crane pick, Transformer

Two crane pick, Transformer

Two crane pick, Transformer

Two crane pick, Transformer

Two crane pick, Transformer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 
 

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Duffy moved a power distribution center out of the manufacturers building, loaded it on our truck and delivered it to the end customer. The building was approximately 36 feet long, 17 feet wide and 70K lbs.

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Power Distribution Center

Power Distribution Center

Power Distribution Center

Power Distribution Center
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 
 

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A 1960’s old, used rail locomotive was donated to Heber Valley Railroad based in Heber Valley, Utah. Duffy Crane & Hauling was contracted to load out the pieces by Heber Valley RR so they could haul the units back to Utah for restoration. They are a non-profit RR museum and also use the old locomotives to provide mountain tours by rail in the Utah mountains.

The heavy pick was the locomotive and weight is approx. 180,000 lbs. We used our 350 ton crane and 210 ton crane to do a tandem lift to load onto a large trailer.

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Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

Engine and Rail Car Move, Boulder, CO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 
 

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The lift was to hoist a 95,000# Genset (generator with diesel engine for emergency power) to the third floor roof structure.
We have been installing CRAC units (computer refrigerated air conditioning ) for the telecommunications gear in the building at this Denver location. Each crane was a 400 ton crane reaching 50 feet up and 50 feet in over the edge of the roof.

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Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

Duffy Crane Madison Communications -  Champa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Working for GE Medical at Platte Valley Medical Center in Brighton. The terrain and location of the entry to the hospital required a 210 ton crane to reach 90 feet in radius and about 20 feet up in elevation with the 13,000# MR magnet. We then "skated" the magnet into the room, set it on center-line and leveled it on the VibroPads (vibration isolation ).

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Duffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical CenterDuffy Crane & Hauling GE Medical Platte Valley Medical Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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